Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Canadian Library Association Launches Federal Election Website

The Canadian Library Association (CLA) has launched the website votelibraries.ca.

The site outlines the Canadian library community's main priorities concerning the future of libraries in the country in the context of the upcoming October 19 federal elections.


They are:
  • unstable funding for Library and Archives Canada and cuts to federal government libraries
  • the long form census
  • copyright
It also offers summaries of the positions of the major parties running in the elections relating to issues such as rural broadband service, social infrastructure, the census, among others.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:32 pm 0 comments links to this post

Law Library of Congress Launches Revamped Global Legal Monitor

The Law Library of Congress in Washington has launched a redesigned and improved Global Legal Monitor.

The online publication covers legal news and developments from around the world.

The new search form allows readers to find items by keyword, topic, jurisdiction, author, and date. It is also possible to browse by jurisdiction, topic, and author.

More details about the changes can be found on  the Library's In Custodia Legis blog.

The Law Library of Congress is the world’s largest law library, with a collection of over 2.65 million volumes from all ages of history and virtually every jurisdiction in the world. 

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:22 pm 0 comments links to this post

Upcoming Copyright Courses

There are a number of upcoming copyright-related courses that might interest information professionals:
  •  Creative Commons Crash Course (October 7). This webinar is being offered by the American Library Association. The speaker will be Carli Spina, Emerging Technologies and Research Librarian at the Harvard Law School Library
  • Developing a Copyright Policy or Guidelines (October 14-30). This online series of tutorials is offered by copyrightlaws.com, a website run by copyright expert Leslie Ellen Harris.
  • Copyright - An Overview (October 16). This one-day class is being held at the University of Toronto School of Continuing Education. The speaker is Jean Bryden, Chair of the Copyright Committee of the Bureau of Canadian Archivists

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:14 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Statistics Canada Article on Youth Court Statistics

The Statistics Canada publication Juristat today published an article entitled Youth court statistics in Canada, 2013/2014:
"It highlights youth court key indicators, including the number of completed charges and cases, characteristics of youth who appear in court, case decisions, sentencing outcomes, and the length of time it takes to complete youth court cases. In addition, trends over time in completed youth court cases will also be presented."
Among the highlights:
  • Canadian youth courts (involving 12- to 17-year-old accused) completed almost 40,000 cases, representing a 12% decline from the previous year. The number of completed cases in youth courts was the lowest number of completed youth court cases since these data were first collected more than two decades ago.
  • Most provinces and territories reported a decline in the number of completed cases, with the exception of Yukon (+17%) and the Northwest Territories (+2%), which reported increases. Prince Edward Island recorded the largest decrease (-25%) in youth court cases.
  • The majority of completed youth court cases in 2013/2014 involved non-violent crime (71%).
  • The most common Criminal Code youth court cases were theft (12%), common assault (9%), and break and enter (8%).
  • Almost all types of completed youth court cases decreased between 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. Some of the largest declines were for cases involving disturbing the peace (-35%), impaired driving (-25%) and robbery (-18%).
  • Males represented 78% of all accused persons appearing in youth court in 2013/2014. In addition, regardless of gender, most (62%) youth court cases involved those aged 16 or 17 years at the time of the alleged offence.
  • In 2013/2014, 56% of all cases completed in youth court resulted in a finding of guilt.
  • Custody sentences were imposed in 15% of guilty youth court cases in 2013/2014, which is down from 22% in 2003/2004. The imposition of custodial sentences has been offset somewhat by sentences to deferred custody and supervision (imposed in 5% of cases in 2013/2014), since the latter was introduced as a sentencing option in 2003 with the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA).
  • The median length of custodial sentences was 80 days for violent offence cases, 45 days for property offences, and 18 days for administration of justice offences. Only 2% of cases received a custody sentence of one year or more.
  • Probation continued to be the most common type of youth court sentence (58%) in 2013/2014. The median length of probation sentences was about 1 year (360 days).

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 9:09 pm 0 comments links to this post

Statistics Canada Article on Adult Criminal Court Statistics

The Statistics Canada publication Juristat has published an article entitled Adult criminal court statistics in Canada, 2013/2014:
"It presents several key indicators of the adult criminal court process, and focuses on the number of completed cases (including the most common types of offences), the decisions made in cases, as well as the types of sentences that are imposed on accused persons who are found guilty. In addition, this article briefly presents results by age and sex of the accused, median sentence lengths, as well as the amount of time it takes to process completed adult criminal court cases and the factors which may influence court timeliness."
Among the highlights:
  • In 2013/2014, there were more than 360,000 cases completed in adult criminal court, which represented a 7% decrease in the number of cases from the previous year.
  • The number of completed cases declined in most provinces/territories in 2013/2014. Quebec (-15%), British Columbia (-9%) and Prince Edward Island (-8%) reported the largest year-over-year decreases in the number of completed cases. In contrast, Yukon experienced an increase (+6%) in the number of completed cases, while completed cases in Manitoba and Alberta remained relatively stable.
  • Most adult criminal court cases in 2013/2014 involved non-violent crime, representing 76% of all completed cases. Impaired driving continued to represent the largest proportion of all completed cases, at 11%. This was closely followed by cases involving theft (10%) and failure to comply with a court order (10%).
  • Property crime court cases decreased by 7%, with the largest declines occurring within break and enter (-12%) and other property offences (-11%) cases. Cases involving administration of justice offences decreased by 4% in 2013/2014.
  • There were 7% fewer violent crime cases in 2013/2014. Cases involving robbery (-15%), uttering threats (-10%), and other violent offences (-10%) had the largest year-over-year declines.
  • Persons under the age of 35 represented almost 60% of all accused persons appearing in adult criminal court in 2013/2014.
  • Similar to previous years, 63% of all cases completed in adult criminal court resulted in a finding of guilt.
  • Probation was the most common type of sentence imposed in adult criminal court in 2013/2014, at 43% of all guilty cases. The median length of probation was 365 days.
  • Custody was the second most frequently imposed sentence in 2013/2014. Slightly more than one third (36%) of all guilty cases received a custodial sentence.
  • Most custodial sentences had a length of less than six months in 2013/2014. The median length of custody was 30 days. Only 3% of custody cases received a sentence of two years or more.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 9:04 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 28, 2015

Supreme Court of Canada Hearings Calendar for October 2015

The Supreme Court of Canada has published its calendar of appeal hearings for October 2015.

To find out more about any particular case, the Court's website has a section that allows users to find docket information, case summaries as well as factums from the parties. All you need to do is click on a case name.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 4:20 pm 0 comments links to this post

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Profile Article About Inventor of Anti-Link Rot Perma.cc Web Tool

The ABA Journal last week published a profile of  "Legal Rebel" Jonathan Zittrain, the director of the Harvard Law Library.

The Law School invented the tool Perma.cc that helps organizations create an archive of permanent links for web citations. It acts as a tool to deal with the growing menace of link rot.

Link rot refers to broken URLs or to URLs that direct to the original site but whose corresponding document has been removed or relocated without any information about where to find it.

Zittrain was the co-author of a paper on link rot in legal publishing a few years ago that found that 50% of the links cited in U.S. Supreme Court opinions no longer worked properly.

Earlier Library Boy posts about link rot include:
  • Recent Law Librarianship Literature (November 6, 2005): "From Law Library Journal, v. 97, no. 4, Fall 2005: Persistent Identification of Electronic Documents and the Future of Footnotes: 'Over the past decade, the use of Internet citations in the footnotes of law review articles has grown from a trickle to a flood. But it is well documented that Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) experience link rot, that is, over time the URL is more and more likely to become a dead link, making the footnote citation worthless or nearly so'."
  • Most Recent Issue of Law Library Journal (November 5, 2010): "Among the articles that attracted my attention: ... Breaking Down Link Rot: The Chesapeake Project Legal Information Archives Examination of URL Stability: 'Ms. Rhodes explores URL stability, measured by the prevalence of link rot over a three-year period, among the original URLs for law- and policy-related materials published to the web and archived though the Chesapeake Project, a collaborative digital preservation initiative under way in the law library community. The results demonstrate a significant increase in link rot over time in materials originally published to seemingly stable organization, government, and state web sites'."
  • Fifth Annual Link Rot Report of the Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group (May 3, 2012): "The Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group has just published its 5th annual study of link rot among the original URLs for online law- and policy-related materials it has been archiving since 2007 (...) In 2012, 218 out of 579 URLs in the sample no longer provide access to the content that was originally selected, captured, and archived by the Chesapeake Group. In other words, link rot has increased to 37.7 percent within five years."
  • CBC Radio Interview about Link Rot in Court Decisions (October 28, 2013): "The most recent episode of the CBC Radio show Spark includes an interview with Harvard Law School researcher Kendra Albert who co-authored an article about link rot in US Supreme Court decisions (...) In the case of the URLs in US Supreme Court decisions, the authors found a link rot rate of 50%. The Spark researchers checked URLs in Supreme Court of Canada decisions and found many broken links to texts from the Canadian Association of Journalists, the Law Society of Alberta and the Uniform Law Conference of Canada, among others."
  • Georgetown University Symposium Searches for Solutions for Link Rot (March 16, 2015): "Retired Supreme Court of the United States librarian Judith Gaskell published an article today on Slaw.ca called Link Rot: the Problem Is Getting Bigger, but Solutions Are Being Developed. The article describes a symposium in the fall of 2014 at Georgetown University that examined emerging solutions to the problem of link rot.."


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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:28 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Elections 2015: Parties Respond to CBA Questions on Access to Justice

This is a follow-up to the Library Boy post of September 1, 2015 entitled Canadian Bar Association 2015 Election Engagement Kit.

During the current federal election campaign, the Canadian Bar Association (CBA) asked the main political parties (Greens, Bloc, Liberals, Conservatives, New Democrats) to answer questions about their vision for equal justice.

The parties' responses have now been made available.

They were asked three questions:
  • What would your government do to bolster federal leadership on ensuring that Canada’s civil legal aid system serves the essential legal needs of all people who need help?
  • What would your government do to ensure people have the legal help they need when they face criminal charges or are incarcerated?
  • What would your government do to save taxpayers’ money by providing adequate legal aid to help meet people’s legal needs at an early, preventive stage


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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:15 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

US Supreme Court Justices Prefer Shakespeare

According to a recent article about the top literary references used by US Supreme Court justices in their judgments, Shakespeare and Lewis Carroll top the list. No surprise.

This was followed by:
  • George Orwell
  • Charles Dickens 
  • Aldous Huxley
  • Aesop
  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky, William Faulkner, Herman Melville and J.D. Salinger (equal number of references)
This reminds of one of my posts on Slaw.ca (back in 2006!) on Popular Song Lyrics in Legal Writing. Oklahoma City University School of Law professor Alex B. Long did a study of citations to pop music stars in law journals.

In descending list of "popularity" among legal scholars:
  1. Dylan
  2. Beatles
  3. Bruce Springsteen
  4. Paul Simon
  5. Woody Guthrie
  6. The Stones
  7. Grateful Dead
  8. Simon & Garfunkel
  9. Joni Mitchell
  10. R.E.M.
As I wrote:
"According to Long, R.E.M. is the only alternative or post-punk artist represented in the Top Ten, 'and even their popularity can be explained in large measure by the fact that lawyers just seem to get a kick out of the title of their song, It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)'."
What might the situation be in Canada?

Referring to another study on the topic of cultural/musical references, the Globe and Mail in 2011 wrote:
"A quick search of the Canadian Legal Information Institute (CanLII) database of judgments suggests that Canadian judges, who tend to have a drier, more no-nonsense style, are not likely to quote Mr. Dylan."
  Pity.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:45 pm 0 comments links to this post

Roundup of SLA Twitter Chat on Career Development

The international information professional organization SLA (Special Libraries Association) held a Twitter chat on career development last week.

The leaders of the event shared advice they would give to someone who is new to a management rol.

The SLA has now published the contents of the event on the Storify website

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:27 pm 0 comments links to this post

September 2015 Issue of Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World

The Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World newsletter, published by Library and Archives Canada (LAC), highlights issues pertaining to government and recordkeeping practices in the public and private sectors around the world.

The September 2015 issue has just been published.
 
It includes:

  • news items from Canada and around the world 
  • announcements of upcoming Canadian and international events (meetings, conferences, seminars) 
  • project and product news in areas such as digitization, archives, open source, e-government, access to information and Web 2.0 
  • listings of papers and readings (white papers, presentations, reports)

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Monday, September 21, 2015

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:13 pm 0 comments links to this post

New International Media Law Database

The International Press Institute (IPI), a Vienna-based global network of editors, media executives and journalists, has launched a database that catalogues legal provisions affecting freedom of the press and expression in European countries and some Caribbean nations as part of its initial rollout:
"IPI Director of Press Freedom Programmes Scott Griffen said the database aimed in part to expose the failure of states, including a majority in Europe, to incorporate international standards on freedom of expression in law."

" 'The past years and decades have seen the development, on the part of international human rights bodies and courts, of clear and important standards when it comes to respecting freedom of expression. But our research shows that governments, including in Europe, which is generally considered to be a safe haven for free expression, have largely failed to adopt these standards in legislation,' Griffen said."

"He continued: 'In practice, this means that laws that disproportionately restrict freedom of expression, such as criminal defamation laws, not only still exist, but are also still applied against journalists and others. In the case of Europe, it also makes pushing for change in countries elsewhere more challenging. This database, in offering a clear and consolidated source on legislation in effect on a country-by-country basis, seeks to raise awareness about the gap between international standards and the reality on the ground and thereby energise the advocacy needed to close that gap'."
The IPI will eventually expand the geographic and thematic coverage of the database. Right now, the database includes information about national laws dealing with topics ranging from blasphemy to insults to the head of state and defamation of the deceased.

[Source: Library Journal's INFOdocket]

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:11 pm 0 comments links to this post

Friday, September 18, 2015

Upcoming Web Courses on Collection Assessment and Electronic Resources Acquisitions

The Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association, is offering two web courses this fall that will be of interest to librarians who manage collections:
  • Fundamentals of Collection Assessment: "This six-week online course introduces the fundamental aspects of collection assessment in libraries. The course is designed for those who are responsible for or interested in collection assessment in all types and sizes of libraries. The course will introduce key concepts in collection assessment including: The definition of collection assessment; Techniques and tools;Assessment of print and electronic collections;Project design and management." (September 28 - November 6, 2015)
  • Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions: "This four-week online course provides an overview of acquiring, providing access to, administering, supporting, and monitoring access to electronic resources. The course offers a basic background in electronic resource acquisitions including: Product trials; Licensing; Purchasing methods; Pricing models. An overview of the sometimes complex relationships between vendors, publishers, platform providers, and libraries is also provided." (September 28 - October 23, 2015)
Each course costs $139US for ALCTS members, $169US for nonmembers.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 8:34 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Canadian Association of Law Libraries Webinar on Job Search Skills

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) is hosting a webinar on Job Search Skills on October 14, 2015 at 1PM Eastern Time:
"Develop your job search skills and join us for this webinar to hear from an expert panel of legal information professional employers. Learn about resumes, interviewing and networking to stand out from the crowd in your job hunt. Hiring professionals with experience in academic, government and private law libraries will address questions put together by the CALL Student Special Interest Group and discuss what they look for when hiring new employees."
Speakers will be:
  • Joan Rataic-Lang, Executive Director/Library Director of the Toronto Lawyers Association 
  • Fiona McPherson, Director, Information Services at Justice Canada in Ottawa
  • Kristin Hodgins, Director, Library and Research Services for the British Columbia Ministry of Justice
  • Kim Nayyer,  Associate University Librarian, Law at University of Victoria Libraries
ALL/ACBD Member: $40 + $5.20 HST    = $45.20/webinar
Non-member: $60 + $7.80 HST    = $67.80/webinar

This webinar is free to CALL Student Members and CALL Unwaged Members. 

It is possible to register online.  

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 5:58 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

More Sources for International Law Scholarship

This is a follow-up to yesterday's blog post on Updated International Law Research Guides From GlobaLex.

Lyonette Louis-Jacques wrote a piece in Slaw.ca today entitled Are There Still Gaps in International Law Scholarship? that describes the many sources for finding topics in international law.

Her article is intended to help authors find alternative sources and approaches to international law topics to they might want to write about, but her list will be helpful to anyone researching international law.

She identifies:
  • conferences, symposia, and workshops
  • blogs
  • legal and regular news sources
  • intergovernmental, international and non-governmental organizations
  • courts
  • new scholarship
 Louis-Jacques is the Foreign and International Law Librarian and Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago Law School D'Angelo Law Library.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:36 pm 0 comments links to this post

Monday, September 14, 2015

Updated International Law Research Guides From GlobaLex

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:16 pm 0 comments links to this post

Sunday, September 13, 2015

Law Library of Congress Staff List of Favourite Works of Legal Fiction

In Custodia Legis, the blog of the Law Library of Congress in Washington, decided to poll the entire Law Library staff about their favourite works of legal fiction.

Lots of Grisham, but also mentions of Kafka, Dickens, Marquez, Gaddis, Connelly among other authors.

The Law Library of Congress is the world’s largest law library, with a collection of over 2.65 million volumes from all ages of history and virtually every jurisdiction in the world.  


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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:47 pm 0 comments links to this post

Alberta Law Reform Institute Discussion Report on Witness Competency

The Alberta Law Reform Institute (ALRI) has issued a Report for Discussion on Competence and Communication in the Alberta Evidence Act (AEA):
"On occasion, a court must determine whether a proposed witness is competent to give evidence. The question arises with child witnesses and may also arise for adults with cognitive impairment. Alberta legislation about competence has not kept pace with modern knowledge about children’s abilities, and fails to address adults with cognitive impairment. It also has a gap affecting witnesses who use alternative means of communication. This Report for Discussion contains preliminary recommendations for updating Alberta legislation to address these issues (...)"

"Significant reform surrounding the admissibility of children’s evidence has occurred both federally and in other provinces. Multiple law reform agencies (including ALRI) have recommended changes to the approach to children’s evidence, and substantial reform has also taken place in other common law jurisdictions. Despite this, the AEA provisions governing children’s evidence have remained essentially unchanged since 1910."

"The AEA approach to children’s evidence is based on the notion that children are inherently unreliable witnesses. However, modern psychological research has undermined these traditional assumptions. It is now widely accepted that many children are capable of providing appropriate and helpful information to a court, particularly if the court and counsel are aware of children’s linguistic and cognitive development and treat them appropriately."

"In contrast, and despite the express regulation of children’s competence, the AEA does not contain provisions regarding competence of adult witnesses. Adult witnesses are presumed competent unless their competence is challenged. If a competency inquiry is required with respect to an adult witness, the common law applies. If an adult is shown to be incapable of understanding the nature of an oath, the adult will be barred from giving evidence. It would be preferable to have a comprehensive set of rules regarding competence of all witnesses in order to promote consistency and avoid arbitrary distinctions between children and adults."



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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:38 pm 0 comments links to this post

Canadian Association of Law Libraries 2016 Conference Call for Proposals

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) is now accepting programming proposals for its 2016 annual conference in Vancouver.

Proposals have to be submitted by October 31, 2015.

Conference proposals need to reflect CALL's Professional Development Pathways approved by the Association's Board in August 2015.

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Thursday, September 10, 2015

Supreme Court of Canada Library: New Interlibrary Loan Procedures

The Supreme Court of Canada library has just posted new interlibrary loan  procedures on its website.

The procedures were updated in June 2015.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 8:16 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 09, 2015

Upcoming Toronto Meeting on Librarian and Justice Partnerships

This is a follow-up to the Library Boy post of September 5, 2015 entitled Access to Justice Initiatives at Local Libraries.

The Community Advocacy & Legal Centre is organizing a meeting on Thursday, October 29 at the offices of the Law Society of Upper Canada on Queen St. in downtown Toronto to discuss how justice partners and librarians can together enhance access to legal services in Ontario's rural and remote communities.

The meeting will go from 10 in the morning until 4 in the afternoon. Registration is free but places are limited. The deadline for registering is September 30.

Organizers want to:
  • Raise awareness about the prevalence of common legal problems with significant impacts if left unresolved
  • Learn about the need for credible and plain language legal information caused by a growing access to justice crisis in Canada.
  • Learn about interesting initiatives in Ontario and across Canada and in other countries like Australia and the U.S. and hear from B.C. Courthouse Librarian Janet Freeman about their innovative Law Matters program, Wikibooks, and ClickLaw website initiatives.
  • To provide fodder and inspiration for potential new projects and new prototypes to make a real difference in our communities.
  • Help you take action with new partners.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 6:45 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 08, 2015

Checklist for Training Users With Electronic Resources

It is once again the season when we ramp up our training activities at my place of work.

Susannah Tredwell, Manager of Library Services at Davis LLP in Vancouver, posted an article today on Slaw.ca on Training Users to Get the Most Out of Electronic Resources. The article provides a quick checklist of things to consider when training new or existing employees and lawyers. Among them:
  • Keep the training short
  • Provide materials ahead of the training
  • Remind people about attendance
  • If possible, offer lawyers continuing professional development credits for attending the session  
  • Have a backup plan for when technology goes awry
  • Involve a second person in the training  

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 8:42 pm 0 comments links to this post

Saturday, September 05, 2015

Access to Justice Initiatives at Local Libraries

Many local public libraries are actively involved in access to justice initiatives.

In a recent post entitled Justice at your library? on the website of PLE Learning Exchange Ontario, Michele Leering, the Executive Director with the Community Advocacy & Legal Centre in Belleville, Ontario, writes about the Librarians & Justice partnership in southeastern Ontario.

She also provides a link to a page about PLE for librarians [PLE = public legal education]:
"Library staff in Ontario are ideally placed to serve as key intermediaries in distributing legal information and referrals to library patrons. Public libraries, law libraries and courthouse libraries host dozens or hundreds of people a day, many of whom might be dealing with legal problems."

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:17 pm 0 comments links to this post

Thursday, September 03, 2015

Canadian Association of Law Libraries Launches Instructional Materials Bank

The Legal Research & Writing Special Interest Group of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) is creating a repository of materials to be used by law librarians in their instructional activities.

The Instructional Materials Bank will serve as a portal to share teaching ideas.

CALL members can submit materials such as:
  • promotional emails/flyers;
  • presentations;
  • lecture notes;
  • syllabi/outlines;
  • tutorials;
  • videos;
  • hands-on exercises; or
  • assignments/exams.
This is a new initiative and materials will be made available shortly.

Academic law librarians should submit their materials to George Tsiakos (tsiakos AT allard.ubc.ca) and private firm, corporate, government, prison, courthouse and law society librarians should send their materials to Kim Clarke (kim.clarke AT ucalgary.ca).

 The Legal Research & Writing Special Interest Group has a listserv for sharing information.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:13 pm 0 comments links to this post

Wednesday, September 02, 2015

Canadian Association of Law Libraries Webinar on Business and Industry Research

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) is hosting a webinar on September 29, 2015 on Conducting Business and Industry Research:
"This webinar provides an introduction to conducting research on business and industry information. The session will provide tips and tricks for:
  • Defining business and market research
  • Sourcing company lists and finding information on specific businesses
  • Finding and using industry level information, including statistics, financial data, market trends and more"
The speaker is Heidi Schiller, Manager of InfoAction, Vancouver Public Library’s fee-based research service.

The webinar will take place at 1:00pm-2:30pm Eastern time.

ALL/ACBD Member: $40 + $5.20 HST    = $45.20/webinar
Non-member: $60 + $7.80 HST    = $67.80/webinar
Student Rate: $25 + $3.25 HST    = $28.25/webinar

It is possible to register online

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 8:16 pm 0 comments links to this post

Tuesday, September 01, 2015

Canadian Bar Association 2015 Election Engagement Kit

The Canadian Bar Association has produced an Election Engagement Kit that will "put equal access to justice on candidates’ radar and publicly call for enhanced federal leadership in this area".

The Kit includes tips for members on how to:
  • Ask questions when candidates come knocking on your door.
  • Attend and raise these issues at all candidates’ meetings.
  • Contribute to the online debate and tweet about it by using the hashtag #whataboutalex.

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:18 pm 0 comments links to this post

August 2015 Issue of Connected Bulletin on Courts and Social Media

The August 2015 issue of Connected is available online. The bulletin covers news about the impact of new social media on courts.

The bulletin is published by the Virginia-based National Center for State Courts (NCSC) and the Conference of Court Public Information Officers.

In this month's issue:
  • Judge blames "mindless digital interaction" for juror texts during trial
  • Ballot selfies legal again in New Hampshire
  • Review the federal government on Yelp
  • Spread your knowledge in Trends 2016
  • Social media tip of the month—don't be afraid to diversify your content

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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:13 pm 0 comments links to this post

NMC Horizon Report - 2015 Library Edition

An international group of experts has published the 2015 edition of the NMC Horizon Report on key trends, challenges, and developments in technology that will have a significant impact on academic and research libraries across the globe:
"This publication was produced by the NMC [New Media Consortium] in collaboration with University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich. To create the report, an international body of experts from library management, education, technology, and other fields was convened as a panel."
It is also possible to consult the NMC project wiki.


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posted by Michel-Adrien at 7:05 pm 0 comments links to this post